Monday, November 14, 2016

Trump and International Security

Facebook   Twitter   RSS
Donate

In this mailing:

Trump and International Security

by Richard Kemp  •  November 14, 2016 at 5:30 am

  • It is the EU, not Donald Trump, that threatens to undermine NATO and the security of the West. An EU defence union will present a direct threat to NATO, competing for funds, building in duplication and confusion, and setting up rival military structures.

  • "You can't say the past doesn't matter, the values we share don't matter, but instead try to get as much money out of NATO as possible and whether I can get a good deal out of it." — German Defence Minister Ursula von der Leyen.

  • This is breath-taking hypocrisy from the defence minister of Germany, which spends less than 1.2% of GDP on defence against an agreed NATO minimum target of 2%, while freeloading off the America's 73% contribution to NATO's overall defence spending.

  • European leaders would do well to recognize that they need the US more than the US needs them, and that real, concrete, committed defence from the world's greatest military power is more beneficial to them than a fantasy army that will have plenty of flags, headquarters and generals but no teeth.

  • Trump should also prioritize both practical and moral support to anti-Islamist regimes in the Middle East, such as Sisi's Egypt.

  • Rather than spreading fear and false propaganda about Donald Trump, they should be praying that he will provide the strength that is so desperately needed today, and working out how best they can support rather than attack him.

(Image source: Twitter/Donald Trump)

Since Donald Trump's election, media-fuelled panic has engulfed Europe, including over defence and security. We are told that World War III is imminent, that Trump will jump into bed with Putin and pull the US out of NATO. Such fantasies are put about by media cheerleaders for European political elites, terrified that Trump's election will inspire support for populist candidates in the forthcoming elections in Germany, the Netherlands and France.

In fact, it is the EU, not Donald Trump, that threatens to undermine NATO and the security of the West. In recent days, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, his foreign policy chief, Federica Mogherini, and German Defence Minister Ursula von der Leyen have suggested that Trump's election should give greater impetus to a European defence force.

Continue Reading Article

Trump's Difficult Ally in Ankara

by Burak Bekdil  •  November 14, 2016 at 4:00 am

  • They will have to deal with a man who says he does not mind being called a dictator.

  • Most recently, the World Justice Project placed Turkey 99th out of 113 countries on its Rule of Law Index 2016, performing even worse than Myanmar and Iran.

  • Turkey is also now the world's biggest jailer of journalists and academics. It also claims the title of the world's biggest jailer of opposition politicians.

  • There is little Europe can do about the new dictatorship emerging at its doors. Germany is offering dissidents asylum. But asylum can only be an individual, tentative solution for a few Turks when at Erdogan's target are millions.

Turkey's political distance from Europe and the West is growing. The EU has said a number of Turkish laws regarding fundamental rights were "not in line with European standards" and expressed "grave concern" over the arrests of journalists, opposition politicians and academics. Pictured: European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker (right) and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (left). (Image source: Turkish President's Office)

Bilateral relations with NATO ally Turkey are probably not on president-elect Donald Trump's top-50 priority list. All the same, when Trump's diplomats will have to work with Turkey on issues that may soon gain prominence -- such as Syria -- they will have to deal with a man who says he does not mind being called a dictator.

Instead of resembling a Western democracy in the European Union -- to which Turkey has long been struggling to join as a full member -- Turkey increasingly looks like Kim Jong-Un's North Korea. Most recently, the World Justice Project placed Turkey 99th out of 113 countries on its Rule of Law Index 2016, performing even worse than Myanmar and Iran. The index measures nations for constraints on government powers, absence of corruption, open government, fundamental rights, order and security, regulatory enforcement and civil and criminal justice.

Turkey is also now the world's biggest jailer of journalists and academics.

Continue Reading Article