Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Some Science News 4 U...


ScienceDaily: Latest Science News Hip replacement patients can skip hip precautions, study suggests Desert plants provided by homeowners offer habitat for desert bird species Neuroscientists find brain pathway supporting an intersection of taste and pain Gene that keeps PTSD-like behavior at bay in female mice Small babies, big data Potential impacts of future heat waves on humans and wildlife Climate change limits forest recovery after wildfires Your body is your internet -- and now it can't be hacked Speedy 'slingshot' cell movement observed for the first time Role of a deep brain structure in concussion Web tool aims to better inform and refine need for treatment in early prostate cancer Mapping the effects of guns, snares and bulldozers on biodiversity Cancer imaging technology can help reveal life-threatening pregnancy disorder Asteroid Bennu, target of NASA's sample return mission, is rotating faster over time Machine-learning model provides detailed insight on proteins First evidence for necessary role of human hippocampus in planning Starving leukemia cells by targeting amino acids Experiences of nature boost children's learning Scientists warn about the dangerous interaction of plant protection products From Stone Age chips to microchips: How tiny tools may have made us human Hydrogel contact lens to treat serious eye disease Opioid crisis: Only a US phenomenon? Rsearchers explore stroke's effects on microbiome Novel potent antimicrobial from thermophilic bacterium Can artificial intelligence solve the mysteries of quantum physics? Little owls on the move Excessive hygiene promotes resistance to antibiotics Discovery upturns understanding of how some viruses multiply Scientists go to extremes to reveal make-up of Earth's core Fear center in the brain protects against illusions Climate Change: Heat-induced heart attack risk on the rise New contributor to age-related hearing loss identified Novel protein degradation pathway Genetically encoded sensor isolates hidden leukemic stem cells The ups and downs of sit-stand desks DNA and RNA Copying made easy What scientists found after sifting through dust in the solar system Tied in knots: New insights into plasma behavior focus on twists and turns Probability of catastrophic geomagnetic storm lower than estimated The nearer the friends, the stronger the regional identity Eating mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline First double-blind controlled trial of TNS shows reduced symptoms in some children with ADHD Dementia looks different in brains of Hispanics How intelligent is artificial intelligence? Big data takes aim at a big human problem New understanding of sophistication of microbial warfare Meet India's starry dwarf frog, lone member of newly discovered ancient lineage Lower costs associated with late-preterm steroid therapy Autonomous vehicles could be an environmental boon or disaster, depending on public policy Adolescents are more likely than adults to use fruit- and candy-flavored e-cigarettes, study finds Groundbreaking test for PTSD developed Impacts of marine and freshwater predators on ecosystems and society Elucidation of structural property in Li-ion batteries that deliver ultra-fast charging Air pollution causes 8.8 million extra early deaths a year UK wild newt species free from flesh-eating fungus for now... How a membrane protein can move both lipids and ions Gene behind long-recognized mitochondrial disease has highly varied effects Some children can 'recover' from autism, but problems often remain, study finds Coal power stations disrupt rainfall: Global study Grasses are better than fertilizer for growing healthy blueberries Hip replacement patients can skip hip precautions, study suggests Posted: 12 Mar 2019 02:08 PM PDT Low-risk patients undergoing a total hip replacement with a posterior approach can skip the standard hip precautions currently recommended for post-surgical recovery, according to a new study. Desert plants provided by homeowners offer habitat for desert bird species Posted: 12 Mar 2019 02:08 PM PDT A persistent question among urban ecology researchers has been the long-term impact of urbanization on bird species biodiversity. Specifically, they wonder whether the portions of cities with higher diversity are simply exhibiting an 'extinction debt' -- populations doomed to extinction but not yet disappeared -- or if other factors such as range shifts or local environmental changes play a role in changes in diversity. Neuroscientists find brain pathway supporting an intersection of taste and pain Posted: 12 Mar 2019 02:08 PM PDT Neuroscientists have found a pathway in the brain where taste and pain intersect in a new study that originally was designed to look at the intersection of taste and food temperature. This study was the first time researchers have shown that taste and pain signals come together in the brain and use the same circuitry. Gene that keeps PTSD-like behavior at bay in female mice Posted: 12 Mar 2019 02:08 PM PDT More than 30 years ago, scientists discovered that mad cow and Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases are caused by prions. But in recent years, Nobel laureate Eric Kandel, M.D., demonstrated in mice that some prions are beneficial and serve important functions in the brain and body. And today, new research from Dr. Kandel describes how one such prion-like protein helps the brain keep fearful memories in check. Without it, female mice exhibit the tell-tale signs of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. Small babies, big data Posted: 12 Mar 2019 02:08 PM PDT The first week of a newborn's life is a time of rapid biological change as the baby adapts to living outside the womb, suddenly exposed to new bacteria and viruses. Yet surprisingly little is known about these early changes. An international research study has pioneered a technique to get huge amounts of data from a tiny amount of newborn blood, creating the most detailed accounting to date. Potential impacts of future heat waves on humans and wildlife Posted: 12 Mar 2019 02:07 PM PDT Climate change is often talked about in terms of averages, like the goal set by the Paris Agreement to limit the Earth's temperature increase to 2 degrees Celsius. What such numbers fail to convey is that climate change will not only increase the world's average temperature, it will also intensify extreme heat waves that even now are causing harm. A recent review paper describes the potential impacts of these worsening events on people and wildlife. Climate change limits forest recovery after wildfires Posted: 12 Mar 2019 12:12 PM PDT New research suggests climate change makes it increasingly difficult for tree seedlings to regenerate following wildfires in low-elevation forests, which could contribute to abrupt forest loss. Your body is your internet -- and now it can't be hacked Posted: 12 Mar 2019 12:12 PM PDT Engineers have tightened security on the 'internet of body.' Now, the network you didn't know you had is only accessible by you and your devices, thanks to technology that keeps communication signals within the body itself. Speedy 'slingshot' cell movement observed for the first time Posted: 12 Mar 2019 12:12 PM PDT By slingshotting themselves forward, human cells can travel more than five times faster than previously documented. Role of a deep brain structure in concussion Posted: 12 Mar 2019 12:12 PM PDT Through a combination of biometric tracking, simulated modeling and medical imaging, researchers detail how hits to the side of the head cause concussion. Web tool aims to better inform and refine need for treatment in early prostate cancer Posted: 12 Mar 2019 11:32 AM PDT A new tool to predict an individual's prognosis following a prostate cancer diagnosis could help prevent unnecessary treatment and related side effects, say researchers. Mapping the effects of guns, snares and bulldozers on biodiversity Posted: 12 Mar 2019 11:32 AM PDT New research reveals that human threats -- like hunting and land clearing -- are extensive across thousands of species' habitats, severely limiting the area they can survive in. Cancer imaging technology can help reveal life-threatening pregnancy disorder Posted: 12 Mar 2019 11:32 AM PDT An imaging technique used to detect some forms of cancer can also help detect preeclampsia in pregnancy before it becomes a life-threatening condition, a new study says. Asteroid Bennu, target of NASA's sample return mission, is rotating faster over time Posted: 12 Mar 2019 11:32 AM PDT OSIRIS-REx finds Bennu's rotation period is speeding up by about 1 second every 100 years, according to a new study. Machine-learning model provides detailed insight on proteins Posted: 12 Mar 2019 10:19 AM PDT A novel machine-learning 'toolbox' that can read and analyze the sequences of proteins has been described today. First evidence for necessary role of human hippocampus in planning Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:38 AM PDT A team of scientists reports finding the first evidence that the human hippocampus is necessary for future planning. The findings link its long-established role in memory with our ability to use our knowledge to map out the future effects of our actions. Starving leukemia cells by targeting amino acids Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:38 AM PDT Eliminating ASCT2 selectively stops the growth of leukemia cells, while having limited effects on healthy blood cells and hematopoetic (blood-forming) stem cells. Experiences of nature boost children's learning Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:37 AM PDT Spending time in nature boosts children's academic achievement and healthy development, concludes a new analysis examining hundreds of studies. Scientists warn about the dangerous interaction of plant protection products Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:37 AM PDT A recent study found that the toxins used in agriculture to combat insect pests and fungi can be more dangerous than expected. From Stone Age chips to microchips: How tiny tools may have made us human Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:37 AM PDT Anthropologists have long made the case that tool-making is one of the key behaviors that separated our human ancestors from other primates. A new article, however, argues that it was not tool-making that set hominins apart -- it was the miniaturization of tools. Hydrogel contact lens to treat serious eye disease Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:37 AM PDT Researchers have created a hydrogel that could one day be made into a contact lens to more effectively treat corneal melting, a condition that is a significant cause for blindness world-wide. Opioid crisis: Only a US phenomenon? Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:37 AM PDT Addiction to prescription opioids has reached a crisis level in the United States. Now the drug is causing concern across the Atlantic. Researchers from Denmark, Norway and Sweden urge caution after discovering that prescriptions for the pain medication oxycodone have significantly increased during the last decade. Rsearchers explore stroke's effects on microbiome Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:37 AM PDT Researchers are investigating how having a stroke can disrupt the community of bacteria that lives in the gut. These bacteria -- known collectively as the microbiome -- can interact with the central nervous system and may influence stroke patients' recovery. Novel potent antimicrobial from thermophilic bacterium Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:37 AM PDT Microbiologists have discovered a new glycocin, a small antimicrobial peptide with a sugar group attached, which is produced by a thermophilic bacterium and is stable at relatively high temperatures. They also succeeded in transferring the genes required to produce this glycocin to an E. coli bacterium. This makes it easier to produce and investigate this compound, which could potentially be used in biofuel production. Can artificial intelligence solve the mysteries of quantum physics? Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:37 AM PDT A new study has demonstrated mathematically that algorithms based on deep neural networks can be applied to better understand the world of quantum physics, as well. Little owls on the move Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:37 AM PDT New study on an owl's re-colonization of northern Switzerland. Excessive hygiene promotes resistance to antibiotics Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:37 AM PDT Researchers present initial approaches to how the spread of antibiotic resistances can be prevented in hospitals. Discovery upturns understanding of how some viruses multiply Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:36 AM PDT Scientists have shown that different segments of a virus genome can exist in distinct cells but work together to cause an infection. Scientists go to extremes to reveal make-up of Earth's core Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:36 AM PDT Experiments conducted at extreme conditions are giving scientists new insights into the chemical make-up of the Earth's core. Fear center in the brain protects against illusions Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:36 AM PDT If functionality of the brain's amygdala is impaired, illusory perceptions arise much faster and more pronounced. This was discovered by a team of researchers, who studied identical twins in whom both amygdalae are damaged. Further experiments with volunteers showed that this brain structure, which is widely known for its eminent role in fear processing, apparently provides effective protection against body perception disorders. Climate Change: Heat-induced heart attack risk on the rise Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:36 AM PDT Heart attack, or myocardial infarction, is the number one cause of death worldwide. A new study shows that the risk of suffering a heat-induced heart attack has increased significantly in recent years. During the same period of time, no comparable changes in cold weather heart attack risks have been recorded. New contributor to age-related hearing loss identified Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:36 AM PDT Researchers have discovered a new potential contributor to age-related hearing loss, a finding that could help doctors identify people at risk and better treat the condition. Novel protein degradation pathway Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:36 AM PDT A research team how a type of protein that is embedded in the inner nuclear membrane clears out of the system once it has served its purpose. Genetically encoded sensor isolates hidden leukemic stem cells Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:36 AM PDT Researchers have devised a novel biosensor that can isolate and target leukemic stem cells. It can provide a prototype for precision oncology efforts to target patient-specific cells to fight the deadly disease. The ups and downs of sit-stand desks Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:36 AM PDT With researchers suggesting that 'sitting is the new smoking,' sit-stand desks (SSD) have become a common tool to quell sedentary behavior in an office environment. As this furniture becomes ubiquitous, conflicting opinions have arisen on its effectiveness. Researchers gathered data from 53 studies and published a scoping review article detailing current information on the benefits of SSDs. DNA and RNA Copying made easy Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:36 AM PDT Whether revealing a perpetrator with DNA evidence, diagnosing a pathogen, classifying a paleontological discovery, or determining paternity, the duplication of nucleic acids (amplification) is indispensable. Scientists have now introduced a new, very simple, yet highly sensitive and reliable method that avoids the usual heating and cooling steps, as well as complicated instruments. The reagents can be freeze-dried, allowing this universal method to be used outside of the laboratory. What scientists found after sifting through dust in the solar system Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:36 AM PDT Two recent studies report discoveries of dust rings in the inner solar system: a dust ring at Mercury's orbit, and a group of never-before-detected asteroids co-orbiting with Venus, supplying the dust in Venus' orbit. Tied in knots: New insights into plasma behavior focus on twists and turns Posted: 12 Mar 2019 09:33 AM PDT Findings from an international team of scientists show that twisted magnetic fields can evolve in only so many ways, with the plasma inside them following a general rule. Probability of catastrophic geomagnetic storm lower than estimated Posted: 12 Mar 2019 07:37 AM PDT According to a group of mathematics researchers, the probability in the following decade of the sun causing a storm strong enough to affect electrical and communication infrastructures around the globe 'only' reaches 1.9 percent maximum. Nevertheless, the event would produce severe consequences and governments should be prepared, researchers warn. The nearer the friends, the stronger the regional identity Posted: 12 Mar 2019 07:37 AM PDT Satisfaction of young people increases when they can identify with the region in which they live. The proximity of people who are emotionally important to them, however, is essential for creating a feeling of commitment. Eating mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline Posted: 12 Mar 2019 07:37 AM PDT Researchers found that seniors who consume more than two standard portions of mushrooms weekly may have 50 percent reduced odds of having mild cognitive impairment. First double-blind controlled trial of TNS shows reduced symptoms in some children with ADHD Posted: 12 Mar 2019 07:36 AM PDT Currently approved in Canada and Europe for adults with medication-resistant depression and seizures, trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) has been found to be an effective and safe means of treatment for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), reports a new study. Dementia looks different in brains of Hispanics Posted: 12 Mar 2019 07:36 AM PDT A major new study has uncovered dramatic differences in the brains of Hispanics with a dementia diagnosis compared with those of non-Hispanic whites and of African Americans. How intelligent is artificial intelligence? Posted: 12 Mar 2019 07:36 AM PDT Scientists are putting AI systems to a test. Researchers have developed a method to provided a glimpse into the diverse 'intelligence' spectrum observed in current AI systems, specifically analyzing these AI systems with a novel technology that allows automatized analysis and quantification. Big data takes aim at a big human problem Posted: 12 Mar 2019 07:36 AM PDT A scientist is part of an international team that's used new 'big data' analysis to achieve a major advance in understanding neurological disorders such as Epilepsy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. New understanding of sophistication of microbial warfare Posted: 12 Mar 2019 06:25 AM PDT Researchers explain how viruses make a molecular decoy that is used to subvert the CRISPR-Cas bacterial immune system. Meet India's starry dwarf frog, lone member of newly discovered ancient lineage Posted: 12 Mar 2019 06:25 AM PDT The starry dwarf frog is an expert hider. Plunging into leaf litter at the slightest disturbance, it has successfully evaded attention for millions of years -- until now. The thumbnail-sized species, now named Astrobatrachus kurichiyana, was discovered in India's Western Ghats. It's the sole member of an ancient lineage, a long branch on the frog tree of life that researchers have classified as a new subfamily, Astrobatrachinae. Lower costs associated with late-preterm steroid therapy Posted: 12 Mar 2019 06:25 AM PDT An analysis of a previous study has found more evidence to support giving the steroid betamethasone to pregnant women at risk of late-preterm delivery (between 34 and 36 weeks of gestation), according to new research. Hospital stays for infants whose mothers received the drug cost less on average, compared to stays for infants whose mothers did not take the drug. Autonomous vehicles could be an environmental boon or disaster, depending on public policy Posted: 12 Mar 2019 06:25 AM PDT Widespread use of autonomous vehicles (AVs) could either massively increase or drastically cut greenhouse gas emissions depending, in large part, on public policy, according to new research. Adolescents are more likely than adults to use fruit- and candy-flavored e-cigarettes, study finds Posted: 12 Mar 2019 06:25 AM PDT As the FDA looks for more information on e-cigarettes and e-juice flavors, a new study shows that adolescents and young adults cite appealing flavors as a main reason for using e-cigarettes, that they are more likely to turn to fruit- and candy-flavored cigarettes than adult smokers trying to quit who more commonly prefer tobacco flavors, and that the younger population are likely to use multiple e-cigarette flavors at the same time. Groundbreaking test for PTSD developed Posted: 12 Mar 2019 06:25 AM PDT Researchers have developed a groundbreaking blood test that could help more accurately diagnose those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Impacts of marine and freshwater predators on ecosystems and society Posted: 12 Mar 2019 06:25 AM PDT A new study reports on the diverse ways that aquatic predators, such as sharks and alligators, can impact ecosystems and also benefit human society. The study shows how these important ecological processes and ecosystem services to society can break down or recover from population losses and recoveries of aquatic predators. Elucidation of structural property in Li-ion batteries that deliver ultra-fast charging Posted: 12 Mar 2019 04:59 AM PDT Scientists have found a way of greatly improving the performance of LiCoO2 cathodes in Li-ion batteries by decorating them with BaTiO3 nanodots. Most importantly, they elucidated the mechanism behind the measured results, concluding that the BaTiO3 nanodots create a special interface through which Li ions can circulate easily, even at very high charge/discharge rates. Air pollution causes 8.8 million extra early deaths a year Posted: 12 Mar 2019 04:59 AM PDT Air pollution could be causing double the number of extra deaths a year in Europe than has been estimated previously, according to a new study. UK wild newt species free from flesh-eating fungus for now... Posted: 12 Mar 2019 04:59 AM PDT The UK's wild newt populations seem to be free from a flesh-eating lethal fungus known to be prevalent in privately-owned amphibians across Western Europe, a nationwide investigation has found. How a membrane protein can move both lipids and ions Posted: 12 Mar 2019 04:59 AM PDT The TMEM16 family of membrane proteins was hailed as representing the elusive calcium-activated chloride channels. However, the majority of the family members turned out to be scramblases, proteins that shuffle lipids between both sides of a lipid membrane, some also with non-selective ion conductance. A new study on proteins of the TMEM16 family shows what the structures of these proteins reveal about their function. Gene behind long-recognized mitochondrial disease has highly varied effects Posted: 12 Mar 2019 04:59 AM PDT Mutations in the mitochondrial gene mt-ATP6, which encodes an essential part of the mitochondrial motor known as ATP synthase that generates cellular energy, are much more variable than previously thought. This prompts the need to develop more precise clinical tests that can better determine the course of treatment for patients affected by mitochondrial disorder. Some children can 'recover' from autism, but problems often remain, study finds Posted: 12 Mar 2019 04:59 AM PDT Research in the past several years has shown that children can outgrow a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), once considered a lifelong condition. In a new study, researchers have found that the vast majority of such children still have difficulties that require therapeutic and educational support. Coal power stations disrupt rainfall: Global study Posted: 12 Mar 2019 04:59 AM PDT Modern coal-fired power stations produce more ultrafine dust particles than road traffic and can even modify and redistribute rainfall patterns, a new 15-year international study shows. The study indicates filtration systems on modern coal-fired power stations are the biggest source of ultrafine particles and can have considerable impacts on climate in several ways. Grasses are better than fertilizer for growing healthy blueberries Posted: 12 Mar 2019 04:59 AM PDT A new study shows that growing grasses alongside blueberry plants corrects signs of iron deficiency, with associated improvements in berry quantity and quality. The effects are comparable to those seen following standard chemical treatment -- providing a simpler, safer, cheaper and more sustainable strategy for blueberry farming on sub-optimal soils.

Sunday, March 10, 2019

« NANCY PELOSI: THE LEADERSHIP OF THE DEMOCRAT PARTY IS CORRUPT | Main PROGRESSIVE SOCIALIST DEMOCRAT RAZZLE DAZZLE: CALLING SOCIALIZED MEDICINE "MEDICARE FOR ALL"


PROGRESSIVE SOCIALIST DEMOCRAT RAZZLE DAZZLE: CALLING SOCIALIZED MEDICINE "MEDICARE FOR ALL" democrat-medicare-for-all Start with the facts… ** For those who are covered by Medicare, chances you have spent a lifetime working to earn both Social Security and Medicare. Medicare is not free and does require the payment of monthly premiums. Unless you have a variant of Medicare coverage that limits access to authorized providers, there is limited coverage for hearing aids, eyeglasses, and specific durable medical equipment. Medicines are covered under a different part of Medicare with its own terms and conditions. ** Some have chosen to cover the deductibles and shortfalls in Medicare with supplemental insurance. ** Medicaid is a social welfare program that covers those who are not covered by private insurance, self purchased or employer purchased, Medicare, or Military insurance programs. ** The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, nearly destroyed the private healthcare insurance marketplace to insure an estimated 16 million additional people – which turns out to be approximately 12 million individuals who were added to the state-run Medicaid programs. There is no doubt that President Obama and his cadre of Obamacare supporters knowing lied to the American people about keeping your present doctor and present medical facility. And, to add insult to injury, the programs available under Obamacare were over-the-top expensive and mandated egregious deductibles. ** There was little or no thought to widening coverage for uninsured individuals without a corresponding increase in physicians, facilities, support personnel, and diagnostic equipment. The entire Medicare and Medicaid programs are fraught with waste, fraud, and abuse – which politicians seem reluctant to discover by adequately funding investigation personnel. ** So-called senior advocacy groups such as AARP actually sold seniors down the river by promoting Obamacare, full well-knowing that the insurance conglomerate behind the majority of AARP’s revenue stream was heavily involved with the formulation and structural operation (healthcare.gov) of Obamacare. ** The progressive socialist democrats want to disguise “socialized medicine” by calling it Medicare for all – and avoid using the older descriptive Single-Payer Healthcare. ** If you believe that the congress has the ability to craft a complex healthcare document without lobbyists and progressive foundations or that government has the expertise to administer a wide-ranging healthcare program, simply consider that the government cannot manage either the Veterans Hospitals nor the Indian Affairs medical programs. Bottom line – Could this be part of something bigger? The progressive socialist democrats want to control our nation and sovereignty through control of our economy. Whether it is called climate change or green new deal, it is all about power and control. And, if this was not nefarious enough, the progressive socialist democrats want to assume control over individuals and how we live our lives by assuming control over healthcare. Never in the history of the United States have we seen a single political party infiltrated by our enemies, both foreign and domestic – enabled by using useful idiots, an infiltrated and complicit media, and activists who disguise themselves as social justice warriors. To add one level of difficulty to the attack, consider our nation is being invaded by illegal aliens who come from an area that is corrupt and socialist. And, make no mistake, there are squishy RINOs (Republicans In Name Only) This is not some right-wing conspiracy fantasy, but a true, connect-the-dots cause and effect example of the power of money and manipulation in politics. I will leave it up to historians to investigate and assess how President Obama, with open associations with socialists, communists, anti-Semites, and anti-America domestic terrorists made it into the White House under the noses of a complacent intelligence community and media. Perhaps, it is possible that our intelligence agencies were also compromised given the recent actions of former CIA Director John Brennan, the Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, Former FBI Director James Comey, Acting Director of the FBI, Acting Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. And let us not forget Hillary Clinton who appeared to be complicit with the joint Department of State/CIA program to arm terrorists with military weapons in Benghazi and whose foundation received hundreds of millions from foreign sources – some linked to Russia and a deal that saw the Russians take control over 20% of the U.S. uranium production on Robert Mueller’s watch at the FBI. Could this be the reason they need to concentrate everybody’s attention on Donald Trump? Unlikely as it sounds, the only thing that may stand between a socialist/communist take-over of the United States is President Donald Trump. We are so screwed. -- steve

Monday, February 25, 2019

THE "JUSTICE FOR VICTIMS OF LYNCHING ACT" IS RACIST AND SHOULD BE RE-TITLED "JUSSIE'S ACT"


THE "JUSTICE FOR VICTIMS OF LYNCHING ACT" IS RACIST AND SHOULD BE RE-TITLED "JUSSIE'S ACT" Let us not forget it was the Democrat Party that was for slavery, segregation, Jim Crow, anti-civil rights, and the KKK whereas the GOP, the party of Lincoln, not only reversed the practice of slavery but brought forth – against Democrat opposition – the modern civil rights legislation. Now the progressive socialist democrats want to advance the false impression that they are watching out for blacks in America. Nothing could be further from the truth if one looks at the inner cities, mostly governed by progressive socialist democrats and in many cases fronted by minority officials. Pretty much why I am offended by Kamala Harris’ email… kh-hdr Making History Friend, As Black History Month comes to a close, I'd like to point out the history that was made just last week when the Senate unanimously passed the Justice for Victims of Lynching Act. Lynching is a murder. It’s torture. But after a century of trying, it’s still not a federal crime. We must speak the truth about our past. These were horrendous acts of violence motivated by racism. And victims and families never received justice. I'm so proud we were able to get this done. With this bill we finally have a chance to offer some long overdue healing, justice and recognition to the victims of lynching and their families. We’re now one step closer to getting this bill finally signed into law. As Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said, "The time is always right to do what is right." Sincerely, Kamala kh-sig I do not care how you are killed, all murders, and those which involve some measure of torture should be treated the same no matter what instrument was used to bring about your death. As far as I am concerned, murder, with the exception of murder on federal property or in the military, should be a state matter and not federalized because of race. That is the constitutional manner where everyone is treated equally under the law. By federalizing this criminal act, one might wonder where all of this nonsense stops. It is as wrong as being tried for a crime, being found not guilty, and then being prosecuted for a civil rights violation to allow grandstanding politicians to point their fingers and say, “See, we are doing something.” By classifying lynching and attempted lynching as a federal hate crime, the legislation enables judges to impose additional sentencing enhancements on top of any other charges when determining the punishment for those convicted of such crimes. How soon will it be before someone, probably a Moslim Congress member introduces a bill claiming that defaming Allah is a federal hate crime? You will notice it is the Democrat Party that appears to be pro-criminal, allowing criminals to plea-bargain away the more serious charges in return for an assured “politically valuable” conviction. It is the Democrat Party that advocates the early release of criminals into our community. And it is the Democrats who fight against legislation enhancing sentences for drug- and gang-related shootings in the inner cities, especially for illegal alien perpetrators. And, you will notice that it is predominantly the Democrat Party that is against the death penalty, even in the clearest of cases where evidence assures the jury that the defendant committed the crime. Bottom line… If I am killed, I do not want my killer to get a lesser sentence or preferential treatment because of what they used to kill me or what they may have shouted when I was killed. Justice demands equality. The Constitution demands equality. We are so screwed. -- steve

The DS’ Green New Deal ... What It May Cost Your Household!


Eakinomics: An Initial Analysis of the Green New Deal The Green New Deal (GND) has rightly received a lot of attention in recent weeks. Everyone should read it. It is a sweeping policy plan setting out ambitious objectives for energy and economic policy, but it is also much more. It envisions re-engineering essentially every aspect of American society and its institutions. Top-down societal engineering should make you very (very, Very, VERY) nervous. One way to illuminate the scale of the proposals is via policy analysis, yet the very breadth of the proposals makes such an analysis difficult. Nevertheless, a bevy of AAF experts has collaborated on a short paper that constitutes an initial foray. The paper puts forward three broad conclusions: The GND’s proposed goals, “mobilization,” and specific policy projects encompass social and institutional changes far exceeding the narrow policy goals, but these changes are impossible to quantify at this point; Many of the policies proposed in the GND are redundant with other aspects in it, which also complicates a precise analysis, as the interactions are difficult to predict; and The GND will be very expensive – our initial estimates for the tractable aspects (best thought of as estimating the order of magnitude) are summarized below. For me, a way to think about the GND is that it is simultaneously a radical overhaul of the production and use of energy in the United States (the “Green” part) and a sweeping revision of the nature of economic relationships in the society (the “New Deal” part). As the table clearly demonstrates, both are quite expensive. The green agenda — electricity grid, transportation system, guaranteed energy-efficient housing — adds up to $8.3 to $12.3 trillion over the next 10 years. The economic agenda — jobs, health care, food security — accounts for another $42.8 to $80.6 trillion. The first cut at a grand total runs from $51.1 to $92.9 trillion between 2020 and 2029. Even if the estimates are 5 to 10 times too high (and I suspect they are more likely too low), it is hard to wrap one’s head around numbers these large. But if you manage to do so, be aware that the likely social upheaval would be even larger.

Friday, February 22, 2019

Space War: Your World at War


Military Space News, Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense February 22, 2019 NUKEWARS US military conducts observation flight over Russia usaf-boeing-oc-135b-open-skies-bg.jpg Washington (AFP) Feb 21, 2019 - The US military is conducting a surveillance flight over Russia as part of an international agreement, the Pentagon said Thursday. The flight falls under the Open Skies Treaty, an international accord aimed at promoting military transparency through reciprocal, unarmed observation flights over each of the 34 signatory countries' terrains. Due to tensions with Russia, this is the first ... more NUKEWARS Trump and Kim to have one-one-one meeting at Vietnam summit trump-kim-usa-korea-handshake-singapore-bg.jpg Washington (AFP) Feb 21, 2019 - US President Donald Trump will have a one-on-one meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong during their summit in Vietnam next week, a US official said Thursday. The two leaders, who met for the first time in Singapore last June, are due to hold talks in the Vietnamese capital Hanoi on February 27-28. Trump is seeking to persuade the North Korean leader to abandon his nuclear arsenal. ... more The Humans to Mars Summit 2019 - George Washington University - Washington May 14-16, 2019 SUPERPOWERS US, Japan, Australia start Cope North 2019 at Guam air base us-japan-australia-flags-bg.jpg Washington (UPI) Feb 21, 2019 - Nearly 100 aircraft and 3,000 personnel from the United States, Japan and Australia are participating in a joint exercise from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam. Cope North 2019, which started Monday and is scheduled to run through March 8, involves the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, Japan Air Self-Defense Force and Royal Australian Air Force, according to a U.S. Pacific Fo ... more SUPERPOWERS US, Britain conduct security drills, training in South China Sea south-china-sea-dispute-600-bg.jpg Washington (UPI) Feb 21, 2019 - The U.S. Navy's USNS Guadalupe replenishment oiler and the British Royal Navy frigate HMS Montrose conducted maritime security and logistics training this week during separate Chinese drills in the highly disputed South China Sea. Participating in the exercise Monday were Royal Marine commandos, Royal Navy sailors and Guadalupe crew members, according to a U.S. Navy news release Wednesd ... more TECH SPACE NASA set to demonstrate x-ray communications in space international-space-station-nicer-x-ray-communication-bg.jpg Greenbelt MD (SPX) Feb 20, 2019 - A new experimental type of deep space communications technology is scheduled to be demonstrated on the International Space Station this spring. Currently, NASA relies on radio waves to send information between spacecraft and Earth. Emerging laser communications technology offers higher data rates that let spacecraft transmit more data at a time. This demonstration involves X-ray communicat ... more Military Radar Summit 2019 MILPLEX How Shanahan may end up as permanent Pentagon chief patrick-shanahan-bg.jpg Washington (AFP) Feb 22, 2019 - The US military is about to pull most troops out of Syria, seems set to slash its Afghanistan presence, and is engaged in a contentious mission on the border with Mexico. Yet the job of overseeing these momentous policies remains vacant - and President Donald Trump's interim pick is under fire from Republican lawmakers. The role is being filled by Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanah ... more NUKEWARS Iran announces 3-day navy drill from Gulf to Indian Ocean iran-revolutionary-guards-navy-bg.jpg Tehran (AFP) Feb 21, 2019 - Iran is to launch a three-day annual navy drill from Friday in a vast area of the Gulf and the Indian Ocean including a sensitive global shipping route, state TV reported on Thursday. "The drill will be held in the waters of Strait of Hormuz, Makran coast, Oman Sea and the north of the Indian Ocean, covering 2 million square kilometres and going on for three days," said Rear Admiral Hossein ... more SPACEWAR Air Force awards $739 million launch service contracts usaf-space-and-missile-systems-center-smc-los-angeles-bg.jpg Los Angeles AFB CA (SPX) Feb 22, 2019 - The United States Air Force's Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC), in partnership with the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), gas awarded two Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) launch service contracts. Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) has been awarded a $297 million firm-fixed-price contract, for launch services to deliver AFSPC-44, NROL-85, and NROL-87 to t ... more The online marketplace for anything space and aerospace related SPACEMART United Launch Services, SpaceX awarded satellite contracts usaf-evolved-expendable-launch-vehicle-eelv-delta-4-iv-atlas-5-falcon-9-bg.jpg Washington (UPI) Feb 20, 2019 - United Launch Services was awarded a $441.7 million contract to launch military satellites to orbit, the U.S. Defense Department announced. The Space and Missile Systems Center of the U.S. Air Force, in partnership with the National Reconnaissance Office, made the award for Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle launch services. Space Exploration Technologies, better known as SpaceX, also re ... more MISSILE NEWS Saab contracted to upgrade Australian Army's rocket warning system counter-rocket-artillery-mortar-c-ram-bg.jpg Washington (UPI) Feb 21, 2019 - Saab said Thursday it will update equipment for the Australian Army's Wireless Audio Visual Emergency System used to detect incoming rockets, artillery and mortars. The Swedish company received the order for the C-RAM in December, according to a press release. WAVES equipment provides early warning audible and visual alerts when the C-RAM sensors detect and identify an incoming t ... more ROBO SPACE Can we trust scientific discoveries made using machine learning? supercomputer-the-little-green-machine-2-bg.jpg Washington DC (SPX) Feb 18, 2019 - Rice University statistician Genevera Allen says scientists must keep questioning the accuracy and reproducibility of scientific discoveries made by machine-learning techniques until researchers develop new computational systems that can critique themselves. Allen, associate professor of statistics, computer science and electrical and computer engineering at Rice and of pediatrics-neurolog ... more CHIP TECH Terahertz wireless makes big strides in paving the way to technological singularity remotely-zero-gravity-operation-bg.jpg Hiroshima, Japan (SPX) Feb 20, 2019 - Hiroshima University, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, and Panasonic Corporation announced the successful development of a terahertz (THz) transceiver that can transmit or receive digital data at 80 gigabits per second (Gbit/s). The transceiver was implemented using silicon CMOS integrated circuit technology, which would have a great advantage for volume pro ... more MICROSAT BLITZ Interactive space simulation for nanosatellites open-cosmos-beeapp-application-interactive-space-simulation-nanosatellites-bg.jpg Paris (ESA) Feb 20, 2019 - Pioneer partner Open Cosmos are taking mission development to a new dimension, using a virtual reality-like simulation that replicates life in orbit for space technologies. Through an innovative combination of a plug-and-play test platform and software, the UK Harwell-based SME is slashing the time it takes for space missions to be designed and qualified for launch. Their online 'bee ... more 2019 DoD Hypersonic Capabilities Symposium | April 17-18, 2019 | Alexandria, VA MICROSAT BLITZ Interactive space simulation for nanosatellites open-cosmos-beeapp-application-interactive-space-simulation-nanosatellites-bg.jpg Paris (ESA) Feb 20, 2019 - Pioneer partner Open Cosmos are taking mission development to a new dimension, using a virtual reality-like simulation that replicates life in orbit for space technologies. Through an innovative combination of a plug-and-play test platform and software, the UK Harwell-based SME is slashing the time it takes for space missions to be designed and qualified for launch. Their online 'bee ... more WAR REPORT Around 200 US troops to remain in Syria after pullout: W.House ussocom-us-special-operations-ops-soldiers-bg.jpg Washington (AFP) Feb 22, 2019 - The US military will keep around 200 troops in Syria after President Donald Trump's pullout from the war-torn country, the White House said Thursday. "A small peace-keeping group of about 200 will remain in Syria for a period of time," White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said. The announcement comes amid fierce criticism of Trump's decision to withdraw America's 2,000 or so troops from ... more WAR REPORT North Korea's forgotten fighters in Vietnam sino-vietnamese-war-chinese-soldiers-bg.jpg Bac Giang, Vietnam (AFP) Feb 22, 2019 - A caretaker tends to the headstones of 14 North Koreans killed fighting in the Vietnam War, carefully sweeping around the plaques honouring Pyongyang's little-known contribution to Hanoi's anti-American crusade. The bodies of the 12 fighter pilots and two technicians were buried here before they were repatriated in 2002 but the rarely-visited graveyard, bordered by rice paddy fields, remains ... more TERROR WARS 'Voice of Paris attacks' killed in Syria: sources isil-isis-islamic-state-fighters-600-bg.jpg Paris (AFP) Feb 21, 2019 - A top French Islamic State jihadist who became notorious after voicing an audio recording claiming responsibility for the November 2015 attacks in Paris has been killed in an overnight airstrike, security sources told AFP. Fabien Clain, who is believed to have gone to Syria in March 2015, was killed in the terror group's last Syrian redoubt of Baghouz, the sources said on condition of anonym ... more TAIWAN NEWS Taiwan's Tsai says no peace deal with China unless force ruled out taiwan-tsai-ing-wen-bg.jpg Taipei (AFP) Feb 20, 2019 - President Tsai Ing-wen on Wednesday said no formal peace deal could be signed with China until leaders in Beijing rule out using force against the island. Tsai was speaking a day after she confirmed she would run for re-election in early 2020 despite falling ratings and an increasingly strained relationship with China. Beijing still sees democratic Taiwan as part of its territory to be r ... more

Today’s Stoic: How a Stoic Thinks About Sex


If you’re born into certain religious faiths, you tend to be raised with strong views on sex that come from on high. You’re not supposed to have sex before marriage or do this or that because God wouldn’t like it. (How that entitles you to regulate what other people do is less clear, but we’ll leave that to another discussion). And if God doesn’t like it, well that’s trouble. It is a rigid and restrictive worldview, to be sure, but it also offers a great degree of simplicity and clarity. Do this, don’t do that. For those who are not religious, however, it is a little less clear what to think about all things sexual. Should you do whatever you want—following every urge and impulse your body has? Should you chase pleasure? Or should you avoid it? What do you teach your children, whose innocence you want to protect, without being controlling or repressive? These are the type of questions the Stoics were always wrestling with, as they tried to find a rational path through the world. A path that was both in accordance with our nature—as they liked to say—and also not ruled by our passions. As it happens, one of the most direct comments we have on sex from Epictetus is both modern and commonsensical: “As for sex, abstain as far as possible before marriage, and if you do go in for it, do nothing that is socially unacceptable. But don’t interfere with other people on account of their sex lives or criticize them, and don’t broadcast your own abstinence.” Basically, try to be responsible and mind your own business. Not a bad way to live. There’s no reason to be a pleasure-hating moralist (that is its own passion, anyway). There’s not much to admire in the stories we hear from Greece and Rome about slaves and prostitution and pederasty either. Worse still are the hypocrites who say one thing and do another. Epictetus’s formula is almost a perfect Aristotelian Mean: Don’t abstain and don’t overdo. Leave other people to their own choices. Keep your own choices private. And don’t think you’re better than anyone else—because you’re not.

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Science Daily...Latest


ScienceDaily: Latest Science News New insight on potent HIV antibody could improve vaccine design Native California medicinal plant may hold promise for treating Alzheimer's The medium shapes the message: New communication technologies may bias historical record Zebra stripes are not good landing strips Complex structures' organization studied in slime mold Peer support, healing hands may curb prescription opioid misuse Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development Correlated nucleons may solve 35-year-old mystery Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell Scientists identify genetic mechanism involved in how females inherit traits Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps Thermally-painted metasurfaces yield perfect light absorbers for high-tech applications Bat influenza viruses could infect humans Putting data privacy in the hands of users Nitisinone increases melanin in people with albinism Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon around Arctic Ingredients for water could be made on surface of moon, a chemical factory Genetic clues to high rates of asthma in those of African ancestry Vigorous exercise, fasting, hormones improve elimination of toxic, misfolded, unnecessary proteins in mouse and human cells Viruses that linger in gut could trigger type 1 diabetes A volcanic binge and its frosty hangover New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness Earth may be 140 years away from reaching carbon levels not seen in 56 million years As genetic data expand, researchers urge caution in how predictors of education outcomes are used Yea, team! Winning fans see self-esteem boost The 'blue' in blueberries can help lower blood pressure Can a nerve injury trigger ALS? Protecting small forests fails to protect bird biodiversity 'Butterfly-shaped' palladium subnano cluster built in 3-D Did you get it? I can see it in your eyes Plants: How cell walls are assembled Cocktail of common antibiotics can fight resistant E. coli Water is more homogeneous than expected New insight into river flows and sediment transport under ice cover Superconduction: Why does it have to be so cold? Melanoma brain metastases are immunosuppressive with treatment-resistant metabolism Physicists 'flash-freeze' crystal of 150 ions Developmental changes resulted in changes to crocodile snouts Genetic blueprint for extraordinary wood-munching fungus Activating tooth regeneration in mice Cold-temperature variability important in evaluating climate change Researchers define cells used in bone repair An intricate interaction: Dietary fatty acid intake influences hypertension risk Young bone marrow rejuvenates aging mouse brains Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot Steep rise in self-poisonings in children and adolescents Extinguishing fear memories relies on an unusual change to DNA The holy grail of nanowire production Drug 'librarian' discovers new compound that may thwart common surgery complication Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat Keeping heavy metals out of beer and wine Combining morning exercise with short walking breaks helps control blood pressure Fibers from old tires can improve fire resistance of concrete New compound could help treat ovarian cancer Young children may see nationality as biological Interacting with more people is shown to keep older adults more active Tinier and less power-hungry quantum atomic clock push toward intelligent IoT Computer simulators show how to reduce damage to lungs of children in intensive care Scientists solve mystery of a fish called Mary's 'virgin' birth Peering inside the mind of the worm for clues on how memories form New insight on potent HIV antibody could improve vaccine design Posted: 20 Feb 2019 02:41 PM PST A new observation highlights the importance of previously unstudied mutations that arises early in bnAbs, giving the antibodies the flexibility to adapt to changes in the virus's outer envelope protein structure. This flexibility enables the antibody to dock on diverse strains of the virus and more potently neutralize them. Native California medicinal plant may hold promise for treating Alzheimer's Posted: 20 Feb 2019 02:41 PM PST The medicinal powers of aspirin, digitalis, and the anti-malarial artemisinin all come from plants. A discovery of a potent neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory chemical in a native California shrub may lead to a treatment for Alzheimer's disease based on a compound found in nature. The medium shapes the message: New communication technologies may bias historical record Posted: 20 Feb 2019 11:50 AM PST The introduction of communication technologies appears to bias historical records in the direction of the content best suited for each technology, according to a new study. Zebra stripes are not good landing strips Posted: 20 Feb 2019 11:50 AM PST The stripes of a zebra deter horse flies from landing on them, according to a new study. Complex structures' organization studied in slime mold Posted: 20 Feb 2019 11:50 AM PST Researchers in Japan think they have found an answer to the fundamental biological question of how individual cells know which way to position themselves within a complex, multicellular body. Depending on a cell's purpose in the larger structure, contact or diffuse chemical signals direct it to its final destination. Peer support, healing hands may curb prescription opioid misuse Posted: 20 Feb 2019 10:36 AM PST A program offering group support, acupuncture, mindfulness, massage and gentle exercise may help prevent patients on prescription opioids from spiraling down to drug misuse, overdose and death, according to a new study. Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development Posted: 20 Feb 2019 10:36 AM PST A team of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development. This new research provides fundamentally important information on how mammalian embryos develop during gastrulation, a key stage of development, and paves the way for new understanding of the earliest stages of life. Correlated nucleons may solve 35-year-old mystery Posted: 20 Feb 2019 10:36 AM PST A careful re-analysis of data taken as revealed a possible link between correlated protons and neutrons in the nucleus and a 35-year-old mystery. The data have led to the extraction of a universal function that describes the EMC Effect, the once-shocking discovery that quarks inside nuclei have lower average momenta than predicted, and supports an explanation for the effect. Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell Posted: 20 Feb 2019 10:36 AM PST A new study has traced an important period of organ formation, cell by cell, in the developing mouse. The study is by far the largest dataset of its kind to date. Scientists identify genetic mechanism involved in how females inherit traits Posted: 20 Feb 2019 10:36 AM PST Female cells randomly and permanently shut off one of the X chromosomes during embryonic development through a process called X chromosome inactivation, or XCI. Just how XCI occurs has remained unclear -- until now. New research performed on mouse female embryonic stem cells traces the origin of XCI to an RNA splicing mechanism. Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps Posted: 20 Feb 2019 10:35 AM PST Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia -- one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source. Thermally-painted metasurfaces yield perfect light absorbers for high-tech applications Posted: 20 Feb 2019 10:35 AM PST Researchers report their insights into how colors are generated on heated metal surfaces and apply those findings to create a nickel thin-film that perfectly absorbs red light. Bat influenza viruses could infect humans Posted: 20 Feb 2019 10:35 AM PST Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. These newly discovered flu viruses could potentially also attack the cells of humans and livestock, researchers have now shown. Putting data privacy in the hands of users Posted: 20 Feb 2019 10:35 AM PST Researchers have developed Riverbed, a platform that ensures web and mobile apps using distributed computing in data centers adhere to users' preferences on how their data are shared and stored in the cloud. Nitisinone increases melanin in people with albinism Posted: 20 Feb 2019 09:19 AM PST A small pilot clinical study suggests that the drug nitisinone increases melanin production in some people with oculocutaneous albinism type 1B (OCA-1B), a rare genetic disease that causes pale skin and hair and poor vision. Increased melanin could help protect people with the condition against the sun's UV rays and promote the development of normal vision. Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon around Arctic Posted: 20 Feb 2019 09:19 AM PST Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon collected at five sites around the Arctic, which has implications for global warming, according to a new study. Ingredients for water could be made on surface of moon, a chemical factory Posted: 20 Feb 2019 09:19 AM PST When a stream of charged particles known as the solar wind careens onto the moon's surface at 450 kilometers per second (or nearly 1 million miles per hour), they enrich the moon's surface in ingredients that could make water, scientists have found. Genetic clues to high rates of asthma in those of African ancestry Posted: 20 Feb 2019 09:19 AM PST In the largest study of its kind, researchers have found new clues into the parts of the human genome associated with the higher rates of asthma in those of African ancestry. Vigorous exercise, fasting, hormones improve elimination of toxic, misfolded, unnecessary proteins in mouse and human cells Posted: 20 Feb 2019 09:19 AM PST A new study shows vigorous exercise and fasting improve the ability of human and mouse cells to remove misfolded, toxic, unnecessary proteins. The findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism that activates the cells' protein-disposal machinery, allowing them to adapt their protein content to shifting demands and new conditions. Viruses that linger in gut could trigger type 1 diabetes Posted: 20 Feb 2019 08:37 AM PST Researchers provide new evidence supporting an association between elevated levels of enteroviruses in the intestinal tracts of children and islet autoimmunity, a precursor to type 1 diabetes. A volcanic binge and its frosty hangover Posted: 20 Feb 2019 08:22 AM PST A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history -- the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago. Researchers have discovered remnants of such a large igneous province that resulted from vast lava flows. New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness Posted: 20 Feb 2019 08:22 AM PST Scientists working in a range of disciplines joined forces to identify a new approach to combat African sleeping sickness. Fundamental research has revealed a promising strategy to develop a suitable agent. Earth may be 140 years away from reaching carbon levels not seen in 56 million years Posted: 20 Feb 2019 08:22 AM PST Total human carbon dioxide emissions could match those of Earth's last major greenhouse warming event in fewer than five generations, new research finds. A new study finds humans are pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at a rate nine to 10 times higher than the greenhouse gas was emitted during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a global warming event that occurred roughly 56 million years ago. As genetic data expand, researchers urge caution in how predictors of education outcomes are used Posted: 20 Feb 2019 08:22 AM PST Authors of a new review article warn that as the predictive power of genes tied to learning and educational outcomes increases and access to genetic data expands, researchers, educators, and policymakers must be cautious in how they use such data, interpret related findings, and, in the not-too-distant future, apply genetics-informed student interventions. Yea, team! Winning fans see self-esteem boost Posted: 20 Feb 2019 08:22 AM PST Fans of a college football team that wins a big game could experience a boost in self-esteem that lasts at least two days after the event, a new study suggests. The 'blue' in blueberries can help lower blood pressure Posted: 20 Feb 2019 08:22 AM PST A new study has found that eating 200g of blueberries every day for a month can lead to an improvement in blood vessel function and a decrease in systolic blood pressure in healthy people. Can a nerve injury trigger ALS? Posted: 20 Feb 2019 08:22 AM PST Researchers have demonstrated that a peripheral nerve injury can trigger the onset and spread of the disease in an animal model of ALS. Protecting small forests fails to protect bird biodiversity Posted: 20 Feb 2019 08:22 AM PST Simply protecting small forests will not maintain the diversity of the birds they support over the long run, a new study says. Forests need to be carefully monitored and managed to maintain their ecological integrity. 'Butterfly-shaped' palladium subnano cluster built in 3-D Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:34 AM PST Scientists have produced a 3-D cluster molecule based on palladium. First, they created a 'butterfly-shaped' Pd4 framework, using an organosilicon compounds bearing the aromatic substitutents as both template and support for the palladium atoms. Then, using another template, they connected two butterfly-shaped Pd4 skeleton, via chlorine, into a Pd6 cluster based on edge-sharing tetrahedra. This strategy using organosilicons to design customized subnano-architectures may enable design of a range of functional materials and catalysts. Did you get it? I can see it in your eyes Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:34 AM PST Small involuntary eye movements, independent of any response, can be used to determine whether one has successfully learned. This finding opens new possibilities in understanding the process of learning in populations that are less responsive to external events, such young children, or individuals with certain mental or physical conditions. Plants: How cell walls are assembled Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:34 AM PST Plant researchers are providing new insights into basic cell division in plants. The scientists have succeeded in understanding how processes are coordinated that are pivotal in properly separating daughter cells during cell division. They describe the tasks of certain membrane building blocks and how plants are impacted when these building blocks are disrupted. Cocktail of common antibiotics can fight resistant E. coli Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:34 AM PST Scientists have discovered that a combination of two common antibiotics is able to eliminate multi-drug resistant E. coli causing urinary tract infections. This combination treatment could become an effective measure against clinically relevant antibiotic resistant urinary tract infections. Water is more homogeneous than expected Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:34 AM PST In order to explain the known anomalies in water, some researchers assume that water consists of a mixture of two phases even under ambient conditions. However, new X-ray spectroscopic analyses show that this is not the case. At room temperature and normal pressure, the water molecules form a fluctuating network with an average of 1.74 ± 2.1 percent donor and acceptor hydrogen bridge bonds per molecule each, allowing tetrahedral coordination between close neighbors. New insight into river flows and sediment transport under ice cover Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:34 AM PST The ice-covered season plays an important role in the development of river channels, a new study shows. The spatial variability of sediment transport and differences in depositional and erosional locations increase in ice-covered conditions. Superconduction: Why does it have to be so cold? Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:34 AM PST Currently, there is no precise computation method to describe superconducting materials. Scientists have now made a major advance towards achieving this goal and, at the same time, has furthered an understanding of why conventional materials only become superconducting at around -200°C. Melanoma brain metastases are immunosuppressive with treatment-resistant metabolism Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:34 AM PST Melanoma tumors that have spread to the brain are equipped to thwart immunotherapies and targeted therapies that succeed against tumors growing in other sites. Researchers report that the heavy reliance of these tumors on a specific metabolic pathway presents a potentially new therapeutic against these lethal tumors. Physicists 'flash-freeze' crystal of 150 ions Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:34 AM PST Physicists have 'flash-frozen' a flat crystal of 150 beryllium ions (electrically charged atoms), opening new possibilities for simulating magnetism at the quantum scale and sensing signals from mysterious dark matter. Developmental changes resulted in changes to crocodile snouts Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:34 AM PST Despite often being portrayed as creatures that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years, a new Harvard study shows crocodiles have repeatedly altered their developmental patterns, leading to much of the diversity found in modern, living crocodiles. Genetic blueprint for extraordinary wood-munching fungus Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:33 AM PST The first time someone took note of Coniochaeta pulveracea was more than two hundred years ago, when the South African-born mycologist Dr Christiaan Hendrik Persoon mentioned it in his 1797 book on the classification of fungi. Now C. pulveracea has had its whole genome sequenced by microbiologists. All because this relatively unknown fungus has an extraordinary ability to degrade wood -- hence the descriptor 'pulveracea', meaning powdery. Activating tooth regeneration in mice Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:33 AM PST Most reptiles and fish have multiple sets of teeth during their lifetime. However, most mammals, such as humans, have only one set of replacement teeth and some mammals, like mice, have only a single set with no replacement. This diversity raises both evolutionary questions -- how did different tooth replacement strategies evolve? -- and developmental ones -- which mechanisms prevent replacement teeth in animals that lost them? Cold-temperature variability important in evaluating climate change Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:33 AM PST New research highlights the importance of considering cold temperature variability, and not just warming temperatures, when evaluating the impact of climate change. Researchers define cells used in bone repair Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:33 AM PST Research has uncovered the roles of two types of cells found in the vessel walls of fat tissue and described how these cells may help speed bone repair. An intricate interaction: Dietary fatty acid intake influences hypertension risk Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:33 AM PST Hypertension is an important public health problem that can lead to life-threatening cardiovascular events, including heart attack and stroke. Here, the relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and hypertension, using blood pressure measurement and a diet history questionnaire. A research team found that increased dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids positively impacted hypertension, but that this benefit was limited to individuals without impaired glucose tolerance. Young bone marrow rejuvenates aging mouse brains Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:33 AM PST A new study has found that transplanting the bone marrow of young laboratory mice into old mice prevented cognitive decline in the old mice, preserving their memory and learning abilities. The findings support an emerging model that attributes cognitive decline, in part, to aging of blood cells, which are produced in bone marrow. Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:33 AM PST New research revealed that foreign honey bees often account for more than 90 percent of pollinators observed visiting flowers in San Diego, considered a global biodiversity hotspot. The non-native bees have established robust feral populations and currently make up 75 percent of the region's observed pollinators. Their monopoly over the most abundantly blooming plant species may strongly affect the ecology and evolution of species that are foundational to the stability of the region's plant-pollinator interactions. Steep rise in self-poisonings in children and adolescents Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:33 AM PST Self-harm from self-poisoning in children and adolescents is not only increasing but starting at a younger age, finds new research. The study found there were more than 33,500 self-poisonings in young people in Australia from 2006 - 2016, with a 98 per cent increase over this time. Extinguishing fear memories relies on an unusual change to DNA Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:33 AM PST Researchers have discovered a DNA modification that enhances our ability to extinguish fear. The findings could help guide the development of new treatments for fear-related anxiety disorders. Professor Timothy Bredy of UQ's Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) said while fear is an important survival mechanism which uses cues in the environment to prompt certain responses, so too is the ability to inhibit fear when it's no longer needed. The holy grail of nanowire production Posted: 20 Feb 2019 07:33 AM PST Researchers have found a way to control and standardize the production of nanowires on silicon surfaces. This discovery could make it possible to grow nanowires on electronic platforms, with potential applications including the integration of nanolasers into electronic chips and improved energy conversion in solar panels. Drug 'librarian' discovers new compound that may thwart common surgery complication Posted: 20 Feb 2019 05:26 AM PST In a strategic search, scientists created and screened a library of 45,000 new compounds containing chemical elements of widely used immune system suppressants, and say they found one that may prevent reperfusion injury, a tissue-damaging and common complication of surgery, heart attack and stroke. Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat Posted: 20 Feb 2019 05:26 AM PST Implantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm. But they have one serious shortcoming: Their batteries last only five to 12 years, at which point they have to be replaced surgically. Now, researchers have surmounted this issue by designing a pacemaker powered by the energy of heartbeats. The device was successfully tested in pigs, which have a similar physiology to humans. Keeping heavy metals out of beer and wine Posted: 20 Feb 2019 05:25 AM PST Researchers report that a material often used as a filter in the production of alcoholic beverages could be transferring heavy metals such as arsenic to beer and wine. They also found ways to possibly limit this contamination. Combining morning exercise with short walking breaks helps control blood pressure Posted: 20 Feb 2019 04:46 AM PST Treadmill walking for 30 minutes in the morning lowered average blood pressure over an eight-hour day among older, overweight or obese men and women. Women who are overweight or obese enhanced the beneficial effects of morning exercise to reduce blood pressure by adding three-minute breaks from sitting every half hour throughout the day. Fibers from old tires can improve fire resistance of concrete Posted: 20 Feb 2019 04:46 AM PST A new way of protecting concrete from fire damage using materials recycled from old tires has been successfully tested. New compound could help treat ovarian cancer Posted: 20 Feb 2019 04:46 AM PST Scientists have discovered a compound that could be more effective in treating certain cancers than standard chemotherapy. Young children may see nationality as biological Posted: 20 Feb 2019 04:46 AM PST Young children see national identity, in part, as biological in nature, a perception that diminishes as they get older. But despite changes in views of nationality as we age, the work suggests the intriguing possibility that the roots of nationalist sentiments are established early in life. Interacting with more people is shown to keep older adults more active Posted: 20 Feb 2019 04:46 AM PST Researchers have found that older adults who spend more time interacting with a wide range of people were more likely to be physically active and had greater emotional well-being. Tinier and less power-hungry quantum atomic clock push toward intelligent IoT Posted: 20 Feb 2019 04:46 AM PST Scientists have developed an ultra-low-power atomic clock (ULPAC) for small satellites to enable future communication systems beyond 5G. The proposed device outperforms the current industry standards in various benchmarks, such as size, stability, and power consumption. Computer simulators show how to reduce damage to lungs of children in intensive care Posted: 20 Feb 2019 04:46 AM PST Changing the ventilation settings for children on life support can reduce the risk of damage to their lungs, researchers have found on computer simulated patients. Scientists solve mystery of a fish called Mary's 'virgin' birth Posted: 20 Feb 2019 04:45 AM PST A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary,' has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilized while they were still inside her, according to scientists. Peering inside the mind of the worm for clues on how memories form Posted: 20 Feb 2019 04:45 AM PST A new study lays the ground for uncovering the molecular basis of memory blocking that has baffled scientists for decades

This Is How the Kashmir Terrorist Attack Could Start a Major War by Mohammed Ayoob


The recent violence in Kashmir has provoked New Delhi. Read it here.

The Unlikely Convergence of Russia, Iran, and Turkey by Scott B. MacDonald...Excellent Read!


The Unlikely Convergence of Russia, Iran, and Turkey by Scott B. MacDonald Although the three-nation summit did not get much press in the West, its emergence is a signal, albeit a quiet one, that Eurasia’s geopolitical landscape is undergoing major changes. Read it here.

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Something for “Lexophiles” like us...!


Lexophile describes those that have a love for words, such as "you can tune a piano, but you can't tuna fish," or "To write with a broken pencil is pointless." An annual competition is held by the New York Times to see who can create the best original lexophile. This year's winning submission is posted at the very end. No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery. If you don't pay your exorcist, you can get repossessed. I'm reading a book about anti-gravity. I just can't put it down. I didn't like my beard at first. Then it grew on me. Did you hear about the crossed-eyed teacher who lost her job because she couldn't control her pupils? When you get a bladder infection, urine trouble. When chemists die, they barium. I stayed up all night to see where the sun went, and then it dawned on me. I changed my iPod's name to Titanic. It's syncing now. England has no kidney bank, but it does have a Liverpool. Haunted French pancakes give me the crepes. This girl today said she recognized me from the Vegetarians Club, but I'd swear I've never met herbivore. I know a guy who's addicted to drinking brake fluid, but he says he can stop any time. A thief who stole a calendar got twelve months. When the smog lifts in Los Angeles U.C.L.A. I got some batteries that were given out free of charge. A dentist and a manicurist married They fought tooth and nail. A will is a dead giveaway. With her marriage, she got a new name and a dress. Police were summoned to a daycare center where a three-year-old was resisting a rest. Did you hear about the fellow whose entire left side was cut off? He's all right now. A bicycle can't stand alone; it's just two tired The guy who fell onto an upholstery machine last week is now fully recovered. He had a photographic memory but it was never fully developed. When she saw her first strands of gray hair she thought she'd dye. Acupuncture is a jab well done. That's the point of it. Those who get too big for their pants will be totally exposed in the end.

Sunday, February 10, 2019


by Jm Moran

2019-02-10T10:58:38.000Z
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Thursday, February 7, 2019


by Jm Moran

2019-02-07T22:36:58.000Z
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by Jm Moran

2019-02-07T22:36:15.000Z
from Facebook
via IFTTTfrom Facebook
via IFTTT